James W.D. Stewart

James W.D. Stewart

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An ever-increasing lack of authority has bred, as a leading psychologist forewarned, a "spoilt generation" of children who believe that grown-ups must earn their respect.  Aric Sigman's research shows, the rise of the "little emperor" spans the class divide and is fuelling ills from childhood obesity to teenage pregnancy.  Attempts to "empower" children, and a lack of discipline in the classroom, have also fostered rising levels of violence — at home, at school, and in the street.

Dr. Sigman, a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, said that nursery-age children are becoming increasingly violent and disrespectful towards their teachers — "parent battering" is on the rise — and the number of policemen attacked by children is soaring.

/blog/2017/05/11/spoiled-fucktards-gone-wild-the-discipline-generation-gap/

https://forces.army/blog/2017/05/11/spoiled-fucktards-gone-wild-the-discipline-generation-gap/

Spoiled Fucktards Gone Wild: The Discipline/Generation Gap

Count Words — Reading Time
by James Stewart
Published: 
Updated:  N/A
Location:  Greater Sudbury Public Library, 74 Mackenzie St., Sudbury, Ontario, P3C 4X8, Canada
 

 

An ever-increasing lack of authority has bred, as a leading psychologist forewarned, a "spoilt generation" of children who believe that grown-ups must earn their respect.  Aric Sigman's research shows, the rise of the "little emperor" spans the class divide and is fuelling ills from childhood obesity to teenage pregnancy.  Attempts to "empower" children, and a lack of discipline in the classroom, have also fostered rising levels of violence — at home, at school, and in the street.

Dr. Sigman, a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, said that nursery-age children are becoming increasingly violent and disrespectful towards their teachers — "parent battering" is on the rise — and the number of policemen attacked by children is soaring.

Dr. Sigman, said:

Authority is a basic health requirement in children's lives.
 
Children of the spoilt generation are used to having their demands met by their parents and others in authority, and that in-turn, makes them unprepared for the realities of adult life.
 
This has consequences in every area of society, from the classroom to the workplace, the streets to the criminal courts, and rehabilitation clinics.  Being spoilt is now classless — from aristocracy to underclass, children are now spoilt in ways that go far beyond materialism.
 
This is partly the result of an inability to distinguish between being authoritative versus authoritarian, leaving concepts such as authority and boundaries blurred.
 
And, the consequences are measurable — Britain now has the highest rates of child depression, child-on-child murder, underage pregnancy, obesity, violent and anti-social behaviour and pre-teen alcoholism — since records began.

For his report, The Spoilt Generation, he drew on 150 studies and reports, including official figures on crime and data on parenting strategies.  Taken together, they showed many of the problems blighting "broken Britain" are linked to a lack of discipline.  This is being exacerbated by misguided attempts to give children more control over their lives.

Dr. Sigman says that youngsters' inflated sense of their own importance is fuelling the obesity epidemic.  Children feel that they have the right to demand foods which would once have been given as an occasional treat.  He suggests, that some children thought to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, might simply have never learned how to behave.  Calling for "commonsense policies" to put children in their place, Dr. Sigman said:

There should be an absolute presumption both in law and in policy that adults "know better" and are in the right unless there are exceptional reasons.  Teachers' authority has been vastly weakened legally, professionally and culturally.
 
There should be a presumption that teachers "know better" and are in the right, unless it is shown otherwise.

He also believes that fathers should have more access to their children following separation and/or divorce.

Separated fathers must be legally recognised as being of paramount importance.

His views were echoed by experts in health and childcare.  Michele Elliott, of the children's charity Kidscape, said:

Children no longer have boundaries.  It's bad for children and it's bad for parents.  Some parents, due to a lack of time, pressures at work and so forth, are trying to buy their children's love, which is toxic.
 
They feel guilty for not being around as often so when their children ask for things they simply say "yes" to compensate.

Professor Cary Cooper, head of psychology and health at Lancaster University, said long working-hours had taken a terrible toll on families.

As a result parents cannot invest the time in their kids that they should.
 
With their parents out to work all the time the children are turning to their peer groups to provide them with the family they need.  We have been more concerned with becoming an affluent, successful country at the expense of investing in our family and our children.

Tim Loughton, Tory children's spokesman, said:

We believe that parents should be taking a greater responsibility for their children and that teachers and other figures in authority should be able to exercise their powers when the parameters are broken.

He said that the Conservatives were devising a National Citizens' Service for all 16-year-olds, giving them the chance to go on a summer challenge — involving outward-bound, team building, and community engagement work.  A Department for Children, Schools and Families spokesman said:

It's pathetic to knock a whole generation of young people through sweeping generalisations.
 
The vast majority of young people play positive roles in their communities, do well at school and are a credit to their families and themselves.
 
Parents, not politicians, bring up children.  We've given police and teachers the tough powers they've asked for to deal with anti-social behaviour, criminal activity and poor discipline by the small minority.
 
We help parents that need the most support through Family Intervention Partnerships.  Standards have never been higher in school and there has been massive investment in youth facilities and activities outside the classroom.  Teenage conceptions are falling and fewer young people are drinking alcohol or taking drugs.
 
Ministers are clear that this should be the best country in the world for children to live — but we know there is more to do and have never made any bones about it.

 

Just the other day, on the news, I saw a report about how everyone's up in arms that our schools are failing our kids.  Teacher shortages, lack of budgeting, and students not being prepared for higher education — let alone, the world.  But, has it yet dawned on you that we're failing our teachers?

Things are very different now than from when I was growing up.  We were raised to have manners, be respectful, listen to our teachers, and do the best work that we could.  We feared the paddle in school and actually had consequences when we got home.  Our parents sat down with us and helped us with our homework.  If there was a problem at school, they went in and talked to the teacher.  But, most of all, they raised us to adhere to the Golden Rule of conduct.

But, today it's quite different though.  Early childhood teachers are expected to raise the children in their care.  The way children are treated today's detrimental to them and to the teachers in their profession.  They're either being spoiled beyond belief or they get absolutely no attention at home.  Therefore, they feel that they're entitled to everything they want and/or are constantly acting out to get the attention that they crave.  This, and many other issues, are starting younger and younger.

 

Not Working on Potty Training

There's nothing more irritating than trying to potty train a child during the week and have it all fail over the weekend.  It's a parent's job to work with the child at home and in partnership with the teacher during the week.  Everyone should be on the same page about how training in each atmosphere — school and home — will be handled.

 

Excessive Spoiling

By doing this, you're teaching your children that they're entitled to everything that they want.  Even at a young age, children in this atmosphere are whiney, mouthy, and mean spirited.  Due to the sphere of influence, they teach other children by their actions, that it's OK to act in such a manner…  That it's also OK to act any way they want.  By allowing your children to behave in this way, you're failing your child's educators.

 

Babying Them

I understand that you need to love on your child and do things for them at times.  However, when you baby them to the extent that they can't do anything for themselves, it makes it hard on teachers in the classroom.  I've seen two year olds that don't eat solid foods because they don't know how to chew.  Their parents don't sit down and work with them.  I've seen six and seven year olds who can't tie their shoes and/or button their pants.

 

Lack of Interest in Their Learning

When I was growing up, my parents worked with me on the things that I was having trouble with.  I see five year olds who don't know their shapes, numbers, and/or colours.  When teachers inform parents of these issues, they get many varied responses…  From total disinterest, to excuses, to smirks and laughter.  It's as if no one cares.  It's not their sole responsibility to teach your child the things that they need to know.  You need to work with them — and the teachers — too.

 

Lack of Interest in Their Child — Period

I see so many parents on cell phones at pick-up time.  Between snippets of conversation, they're telling their children to get ready-to-go.  This, is heartbreaking.  You've been apart from them all day and can't spare five minutes to ask them how their day was?  Although, this is a small example, it explains why some of the children are stuck like glue to the teacher all day.  They don't get enough attention at home so they'll do anything at school to get attention of any kind.  Some kids are glued to them at the hip, while others act-out.

 

Not Allowing Teachers to Discipline

I've come across parents who don't want their children to be put in time-out and/or disciplined.  In their eyes, their children are "just babies" and don't know right from wrong.  This is, regardless, that the children are ages two and five.  This request makes handling a classroom of sixteen to twenty, especially, difficult.  The child knows that there are no consequences at home nor school.  So, they'll be defiant and get in trouble.  This, in-turn, encourages their classmates to act the same way.  It also puts a strain on teachers.  They spend more time managing those who act-out than they do teaching and preparing children to be successful.  They're supposed to be teaching them necessary skills.  The fact that they have to constantly stop what they're doing's a disservice to the children, themselves, and to the future of our society.

 

All of these examples and scenarios lead to chaos and great frustration in the classroom.  Don't misunderstand, teachers love your children and want to see them grow, be happy, and be successful.  However, they strongly need for the parents to step-up and support them and the purpose of their job.  If we all work together, classrooms will run smoother, our children will be happier and ready-to-learn, and we can all thrive.

 

Recently, a research centre in the United Kingdom found that lavishing praise upon students — particularly, low-attaining students — may be counter-productive.  By providing a no-consequence/no-failure environment, in which the top priority's to make everybody feel good about themselves, we're doing little more than setting young people up to fail.

It would appear that our modern education systems have delivered us not only a back-slide of Australian student rankings, but also the highest youth unemployment rate in decades.  Research suggests that basic employability skills — where the worker can arrive on time, take instruction, and get along with others — are wanting in this generation of young people.

An advertisement for an apprentice, recently posted on a job Web site, perfectly summarized the difficulty faced by employers trying to give a young person a go.  It listed only two selection criteria:

  1. Can turn-up Monday through Friday.
  2. Not afraid to work.

The stories that came my way shared a common history…  Early-on, in the training path of some young people, there can be a total disconnect between the individual's assessment of their strengths and weaknesses as compared to everyone else's.

This isn't anything new.  Typically, coined "poor insight", there's a raft of research including the aptly named Why the Unskilled are Unaware that demonstrates the cognitive mechanisms at fault here — or, more simply put, why stupid people don't know that they're stupid.

But, what happens when this person hits your training environment?  What's the education system's role, responsibility, and/or duty of care — and, to whom — in this situation?

 

Can Education Fix This?

Sadly, our modern education system's become complicit in the business of manufacturing aspirations, no matter how delusional.  This is facilitated by the ever-present fear of litigation if little Johnny and/or Sally becomes in any way upset by honest feedback regarding their performance.

This has left teaching staff too terrified to have conversations with students as to whether they're suited to their chosen career path, or at genuine risk of being found guilty of discrimination, if they apply consequences for poor progress and/or dysfunctional behaviours that wouldn't be tolerated in a workplace.

Here are a couple of examples:

  • TAFE trainee X was capable of doing the tasks required of him.  However, he had a habit of proffering potentially dangerous advice to clients outside of his training — despite being been told not to do this.  His placement took to hiding the phone from him.  He also over-shared gruesome details of his chaotic personal life to stunned clients.  Trainee X was convinced that he'd be offered employment, at the end of his stint, although his placement told him not to expect this — privately, labelling him "a disaster" and "unemployable".
  • University student Y committed a serious, immoral, and (un)professional foul during a work placement — raising serious concerns, regarding her character and fitness, to practice.  Against her supervisors' recommendation, her university rewarded her behaviour with a second chance to complete her placement, inflicting her upon another — unwitting — workplace.

Consider also, the impact of the various get-out-of-jail-free cards — appeals, exam re-sits, extensions, supplementary assessments — available to students in the case of poor performance, shambolic time-management, and/or concerning interpersonal behaviours (i.e. lack of initiative, poor team skills, poorly developed ethics, unadaptable to change, etc.).  Would these be available in the work place?

While there's an interesting and nuanced debate to be had about if and how educators could teach personal attributes and employability skills, the most basic understanding of how consequences shape human behaviour would suggest that rewarding such conduct by making excuses and allowing endless chances will only groom future unemployables.

 

It's for Their Own Good

Has it occurred to anyone else, that by providing a fantasy training environment which in no way reflects the expectations of a real workplace, actually isn't fair to students?

When educators are prevented from providing genuine feedback and applying realistic consequences, we deny students the opportunity to recognise and play to their strengths, while reflecting upon their weaknesses — to change any counter-productive attitudes/behaviours and/or redirect their efforts into a more suitable career course.

The solution, requires a shift in attitude from educational organisations, students — and, their parents — with clear legal protections in-place for educators who, rather than setting students up to fail, actually want them to learn how to succeed.

 
Categories:  Business, Career, Education, Law, Lifestyle, Parenting, University  
Tags:  Family, Home, Opinionated, The Stupid, The Suck

 
Syndicated to:

 
References:

  1. A fine balance: disability, discrimination and public safety
    by Malcolm Parker Published: 
    Referenced: 
  2. Australia's students slide in international rankings
    by Fran Kelly Published: 
    Referenced: 
  3. Australian youth unemployment 2014: snapshot
    by Brotherhood of St. Laurence Published: 
    Referenced: 
  4. Bulldozer parents: creating psychologically fragile children
    by Rachael Sharman Published: 
    Referenced: 
  5. Careers advice system failing Australian schoolchildren, says National Centre for Vocational Education and Research study
    by Ben Pike Published: 
    Referenced: 
  6. Failed student Christopher Miller sues for Southern Cross Uni refund
    by Julie Hare Published: 
    Referenced: 
  7. School 'failed to get me into law'
    by Benjamin Preiss Published: 
    Referenced: 
  8. The discursive construction of the 'competent' learner-worker: from key competencies to 'employability skills'
    by Carolyn Williams Published: 
    Referenced: 
  9. The Royal Society of Medicine
    by Royal Society of Medicine Referenced: 
  10. The Spoilt Generation
    by Aric Sigman Published: 
    Referenced: 
  11. What makes great teaching?
    by Cesare Aloisi, Robert Coe, Steve Higgins, Lee Elliot Major Published: 
    Referenced: 
  12. Why the Unskilled Are Unaware: Further Explorations of (Absent) Self-Insight Among the Incompetent
    by Matthew Banner, David Dunning, Joyce Ehrlinger, Kerri Johnson, Justin Kruger Referenced: 

 

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Creative Commons Licence :: BY-NC-SA James W.D. Stewart by James Stewart is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.  Based on a work at https://github.com/jwds1978/jwds1978.github.io.