James W.D. Stewart

James W.D. Stewart

Embrace "The Suck"


Home  •  About  •  Blog  •  Blogroll  •  Contact  •  Donate  •  Freelance  •  Gallery  •  In Case of Emergency  •  Résumé  •  Socialize  •  The Suck

 

 

 

Share to:  E-mail  •  Facebook  •  Google+  •  LinkedIn  •  Pinterest  •  Reddit  •  Tumblr  •  Twitter

 

People, often, ask me what I miss about serving in the military…  My answer — the camaraderie.

All this craziness going on within our country makes me want to go back into the military.  Asian, black, disabled, female, from big city or small town, gay/lesbian, latino, male, short, tall, white…  It didn't matter what the fuck you were — we worked side-by-side and respected each other.  We all had our opinions and disagreements, but respect is what kept us united — especially, during times of combat.

I'm saddened to see the shit that goes on in Canada.  At least, what most of the news portrays today anyhow.

/blog/2017/04/23/camaraderies-one-trait-the-civilian-sectors-lacking/

https://forces.army/blog/2017/04/23/camaraderies-one-trait-the-civilian-sectors-lacking/

Camaraderie's One Trait the Civilian Sector's Lacking

Count Words — Reading Time
by James Stewart
Published: 
Updated:    Added a YouTube Video
Location:  Greater Sudbury Public Library, 74 Mackenzie St., Sudbury, Ontario, P3C 4X8, Canada
 

 

People, often, ask me what I miss about serving in the military…  My answer — the camaraderie.

All this craziness going on within our country makes me want to go back into the military.  Asian, black, disabled, female, from big city or small town, gay/lesbian, latino, male, short, tall, white…  It didn't matter what the fuck you were — we worked side-by-side and respected each other.  We all had our opinions and disagreements, but respect is what kept us united — especially, during times of combat.

I'm saddened to see the shit that goes on in Canada.  At least, what most of the news portrays today anyhow.

I've been out of the military since circa 2000.  And, to this day, I've not found the bond, camaraderie, discipline, and/or work ethic that I'd witnessed first-hand while serving in uniform.  When returning to the civilian sector, you may very well find it difficult to relate and/or work with others — it's not uncommon.  I speak to veterans on a daily basis and hear this on numerous occasions — even, from older veterans.  Of course, we're in changing times, but this isn't the first time going through this escapade.  It's beyond my belief that people still can't respect one another's opinion and try to find some common ground.

For us veterans, coming from a disciplined life in uniform, all of this can really have an impact on our lives.  Especially, when it comes to being an employee and/or student.  A student veteran that I've spoken to, just recently, has been separated from the military for less than an a year.  To my surprise, at our last meeting, she was on her way to going back into the Navy — stopping her education short, to return to where she felt comfortable.  Her reason was quite simple:

I cannot relate to civilians after years of military service.

This could be you, and if so, you're not alone.  For many of our combat veterans, separating from the military and entering the civilian world, is a path many aren't comfortable taking on.  For these veterans, simply being wounded is stress enough…  But, imagine now, having to start your life all over in an ever-changing civilian world.  Thankfully, there are organizations out there for our disabled veterans that can continue to give them that sense of service to their country.

The decision to take a leap of faith into any risky adventure takes a myriad of personality traits — such as courage, tenacity, and trust.  You're always facing hurdles requiring strength and challenges needing creativity.  However, going it alone for the length of your journey is incredibly exhausting — and, foolish.  That's why there's no such thing as a one man army or a truly one man company.

In the military, you work together, train together, patrol together, fight together — you do everything together.  Doing this for a career, instills a strong sense of community and shared experiences that's bonded by trust.  I can go years without seeing a military friend and immediately know that he/she has my back if I needed the help.  Some friends will help you move out of your apartment, but others will help you bury a body.  This is a common military dysphemistic point…  I don't ever intend to be in a situation where I have to bury someone or something.
 

This shared sense of camaraderie is crucial in picking teams that endure tough endeavors.  This may be more of a positive consequence of being from the military and not technically a "trait" — but, it's still something that's closely associated with both the start-up world and being a veteran.  Therefore, it's important to discuss.

Like the military, you have to work with a team or you'll fail.  No "buts" here…  Fact.  You have co-founders and/or employees, accountants, lawyers, investors, advisors, board members.  The team's large and extensive.  You'll be closer to some than others.  Especially, your co-founder(s).  So, reaching out to them and working with them through your difficult moments for a positive effect can have some great benefits in the long run — one of them, being a sense of camaraderie.  It's a fantastic perk of being part of something noble and everyone should look forward to these kinds of intrinsic rewards.

 
Categories:  Lifestyle  
Tags:  MyCAF, Opinionated, Self, The Suck

 
Syndicated to:

 
References:

  1. Dysphemism
    by Innominate Published: 
    Referenced: 

 

Share to:  E-mail  •  Facebook  •  Google+  •  LinkedIn  •  Pinterest  •  Reddit  •  Tumblr  •  Twitter

 

 

 

 


DISCLAIMER:  Neither the forces.army domain nor any of its sub-domains are associated with and/or sponsored by any national and/or international government agency or branch of the armed forces in any nation.


Atom  •  Comments  •  Privacy Policy  •  Sitemap  •  Terms and Conditions

 
IndieWebCamp
 
 
Links Monetized by VigLink
 

Creative Commons Licence :: BY-NC-SA James W.D. Stewart by James Stewart is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.  Based on a work at https://github.com/jwds1978/jwds1978.github.io.